1930s

The following list provides links to texts by well-known and forgotten Australian women writers published in the 1930s which are available either to be read online or for download. They are organised alphabetically by author in decade of publication.

Links below are to Trove unless otherwise stated. Note: for State Library of Victoria (SLVIC) digital collections, access conditions apply.

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< Texts by Australian women published in 1920s

Adams, Bertha Southey aka Bertha Adams, B. S. Adams, Mrs T C Brammall, Bertha Southey Brammall, Bertha Brammall; b. 1877 Hamilton, Tas; d. 1957 Sydney, NSW; biographical snippet (21 Mar 1936); widowed 1945 (ref)
— “A cup of tea” (1939, poem; “first prize for set of verses on a homely object”)
— “The airman” (1933, poem; note included: “These verses were written and dedicated to the intrepid Herbert Hinkler on the occasion of his first flight to Australia. He wrote personally to Mrs. Brammall, thanking her for them.”)
— “The custodian” by B S Adams (1933, short story)
— “Good-bye” (1939, poem)
— “The minah” (1937, poem)
— “The old mill” (1937, poem)
— “Hinkler in Italy” (1933, poem)
— “The pioneer” (1933, poem; note included: “A tribute to Philosopher Smith [James Smith], the discoverer of Mr. Bischoff, who was the first to take the trail on the West Coast Road, on foot, in 1882.)
— “Proposal and answer” (1936, poem)
— “The song of the Derwent” (1938, poem)
— “Stay” (1935, poem)

Anderson, Ethel, aka Ethel Campbell Louise Anderson, Mrs Austin Anderson; b. 16 Mar 1883, Lillington, Warwickshire, England; d. 4 Aug 1958, Turramurra, New South Wales. The AustLit database lists over 160 works for Anderson. During the 1930s, Anderson had work published in The Home: an Australian quarterly, Art in Australia, Manuscripts: the book nook miscellany, and elsewhere. [Work in copyright until 2028.]
— “Admiralty: garden of rocks and winds” (1936, prose)
— “Beauty’s votary: the poet laureat’s last poem” (1930, prose)
— “Pan’s garden: a landscape with one, fugitive” (1935, short story)

Aston, Matilda Ann aka Aston, Tilly b.11 Dec 1873, Carisbrook Vic; d.1 Nov 1947, Windsor Vic; obituary 3 Nov 1947
— “A resourceful man: why bother about handicaps?” (1938, prose)
Old timers: sketches and word pictures of the old pioneers, Lothian Publishing Co., Melbourne, 1938, 148 pp.
— “On writing a book” (1939, prose)
— “The rainbow” (1935, poem)
— “They also read who cannot see” (1939, prose)

Baily, Elsie Marion. aka E. M. Baily, Elsie Marion Croll d. 19 Nov 1974, Sydney, NSW.
— “Birds of a feather” (1937, short story, crime)
The chains of yesterday, (novella) published 4 May 1935 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove.
Before the dawn (published in The Australian Women’s Weekly 1934)
Outcast of Eden, Sydney: Johnson, 1933, 252 pp. (downloadable as pdf)
— “Passing the love of women” (1934): intro; ch1; ch1 (cont.); ch1 (cont.); ch2 (cont.); ch2 (cont.); ch3 (cont.); ch 3 (cont.); ch4 (cont.); ch5 (cont.); ch5 (cont.); ch6 (cont.); ch7 (cont.); ch7 (cont.); ch8 (cont.); ch8 (cont.); ch9 (cont.) – poor scan quality; ch9 (cont.); ch10 (cont.); ch11 (cont.); ch11 (cont.); ch12 (cont.); ch12 (cont.); ch13 (cont.); ch13 (cont.); ch14 (cont.); ch15 (cont.); ch15 (cont.); ch16 (cont.); ch17; ch17 (cont.); ch18; ch18 (cont.); ch18 (cont.); ch19 (cont.); ch19 (cont.); ch20 (cont.); ch20 (cont. final).
— “Wings of the morning” (1937): ch1 (1 May); 8 May; 15 May; 22 May; 29 May; 5 June; 12 Jun; 19 Jun; 26 Jun; 3 Jul; 10 Jul; 17 Jul; 24 Jul; 7 Aug; 14 Aug; 21 Aug (final).

Barnard, Marjorie b. 1897; d. 1987. Part of writing team “M Barnard Eldershaw – see separate entry)
— “First prize (of a lottery winner)” (1937, short story)
— “Only the poet” (1936, column)

Bavin, Edyth birth name Edyth Ellen Winchcombe; aka Edyth Ellen Banin, Lady Bavin; b. 1879, Surry Hills, NSW; d. 1942, Vaucluse, NSW; obituary 18 Nov 1942.
— “A number of things: difficulties of a collector” (1930, prose)
— “Albert” (1930, poem)
— “An Interrupted interview” (1933, poem)
— “An old treatise: manners of English ladies” (1930, prose)
— “Angling the trout: a fisherman’s wife who tells” (1934, prose)
— “Belinda said ‘won’t‘” (1931, poem)
— “Christmas Morn – en famille” (1934, prose)
— “Christine” (1933, short story)
— “Copenhagen: fountains and market” (1932, prose)
— “Crumbs for mousie” (1930, poem)
— “Taking the ‘D’ out of domestic duties” (1933, prose)
— “Elizabeth Anne” (1930, poem)
— “Home-signs” (1932, poem)
— “Home for Incurables’ is too hopeless” (1933, prose; has pen drawing of author)
— “Indian lullaby” (1932, poem)
— “It isn’t easy” (1934, poem)
— “Jennifer Jane” (1933, poem)
— “Midnight” (1932, short story)
— “The mouse family” (1930, poem)
— “Music week: open air possibilities” (1930, prose)
— “No. 5.” (1933, short story; illustrated by Dorothy Ellsmore Paul)
— “Progress: must it spell ugliness?” (1930, prose)
— “Sussex by the sea” (1939, prose)
— “Wet weather” (1931, poem)
— “What will I be?” (1932, poem)
— “When I’m grown up” (1931, poem)
— “William, an old-fashioned gardener” (1931, prose)
— “Winter in England: its beauty and charm” (1932, prose)

Bedford, Ruth aka Ruth M Bedford b. 2 Aug 1882, Petersham, NSW; d. 24 Jul 1963, Paddington NSW.
— “The birthday cake” (1931, poem)
— “Bond or free?” (1933, poem)
— “The Brownings: a great love story” (1932, prose)
— “Bush flowers” (1933, poem)
— “Fugitive” (1931, poem)
— “On the ocean wave: life aboard ship” (1930, prose)
— “Pavlova” (1931, poem)
— “The silent meeting” (1932, poem)
— “Timothy Turveydrop” (1933, poem)
— “The voracious vegetarian” (1933, poem)

Bevan, Beatrice Vale birth name: Beatrice Vale; also writes as Mrs Willett Bevan, B V B; bo. 1876, Vic; d. 1946, Adelaide, SA. Obituary 13 Apr 1945.
— “A Christmas carol” (1930, poem)
— “Adam Lindsay Gordon” (1937, prose)
— “Adam Lindsay Gordon” (1938, dramatisation)
— “Advent: a Christmas story” (1931; poetical dramatisation)
— “Back to Gawler” (1936, poem)
— “Christmas, 1930” (1930, prose; “For the Children”; writing as “BVB”)
— “The deathless army” (21 Apr 1933, poem; “A tribute to the Anzacs”)
— “Gallipoli” (1931, poem)
— “Killed in action” (29 Apr 1932, poem; “For the children” page)
— “The landing” (29 Apr 1936, poem)
— “Lines for Violet Memory Day” (1932, poem)
— “Mother’s Day, 1930” (1930, poem)
— “Mrs W R Milne: an appreciation” (1933, prose)
— “Violet Memory Day 1933” (1933, poem)

Birkett, Winifred.
Three goats on a bender, published 29 October 1938 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove.

Bjelke-Petersen, Marie aka Marie Caroline Bjelke-Petersen; also writes as B.P. and B-P. b. 23 Dec 1874, Jagtvejen, Copenhagen, Denmark; d. 11 Oct 1969, Lindisfarne, Tas.
Dusk (1933, novel; published in Australian’s Women’s Weekly; dust jacket)
Moon Minstrel (1935, novel; published in Australian’s Women’s Weekly)
— “Selecting characters for a book” (1935, prose)

Boake, Capel aka Doris Boake Kerr b. 29 Aug 1899; d. 5 Jun 1944. Essay including a discussion of Boake’s work, 2009.
— “Anzac Day” (1930, poem)
— “Birth of a novel: the spinning of ‘The dark thread’” (1936, essay)
— “Christmas lilies” (1932, poem)
The dark thread (1936, novel)
— “Desire” (1932, poem)
— “Jenny” (1930, short story)
— “The last song” (1938, short story)
— “Roads” (1932, poem)
— “Rose Aylmer” (1930, short story)

Brewster-Jones, Rebecca b. c1850s; d. c1943
Bolero (1931, drama and poetry)

Bridges, Hilda,**
The house with the black blinds,  published 4 December 1930 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove.

Bulcock, Emily, birth name: Emily Palmer; aka Emily Hemans Bulcock,  Emily H Bulcock; b. 28 Jul 1877, Tinana, QLD; d. 4 Sep 1969, Qld. Bulcock was a prolific poet who had many individual poems published during the1930s in The Brisbane Courier, and elsewhere.

Campbell, Anita b. c 1910 NSW
— “Magic” (1935, poem for children)

Carey, Anna (1904?-?).
— “Experience” (1931, poem)

Chadwick, Dorothy,**
Young April, published 26 Feb 1938 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove.

Clark, Marjorie aka Georgia Rivers. b. 1897 Melbournce, Vic; d. 1989, Melbourne, Vic.
— “Crinoline comedy” (1931, short story, romance)
— “Desperate ills” (1933, short story)
— “It’s hard to say, isn’t it?” (1939, short story)
— “Pianissimo” (1930, poem)
— “The pinch of pepper” (1933, short story)
— “Smooth management” (1930, short story)
— “The unborn” (1930, poem)

Clyde, Constance. See entry for Constance McAdam.

Collins, Naomi b. 1875-?, McLaren Vale, SA
— “Early Wimmera settlers” (1946, prose; includes some biographical information)
— “Healing work” (1938, poem; “Orwell, Lillimur, Vic.”)
Home links and other poems (1937, poetry) – link to SLVIC digital collection

Crist, Alice Guerin, birth name: Alice Guerin; b. 8 Feb 1876, Ireland; d. 13 Jun 1941, Toowoomba, Qld. Arrived in Australia 20 Jan 1879; biographical snippet 21 Feb 1935; obituary 17 Jul 1941.
— “A little git o’ green” (1933, poem)
— “All saints” (1931, poem)
— “An Irish night” (1931, poem)
— “An old garden” (1931, poem)
— “Armistice Day” (1932, poem)
— “Australia – 1931” (1931, poem)
— “Candlemas” (1932, poem)
— “Centenary of the Sisters of Mercy (founded by Catherine McAuley, 1931)” (1931, poem)
— “Constance Le Plastrier” (1938, prose)
— “Corpus Christi” (1931, poem)
— “The day we celebrate” (1930, poem)
— “Downlands” (1937, poem)
— “Earth-bound” (1931, poem)
— “The grief of a nation” (1936, poem)
— “Jubilee greetings” (1933, poem; “written for the Golden Jubilee of the Sisters of St Joseph, Glen Innes”)
— “The memory of the dead” (25 Apr 1935, poem)
— “Men of good will” (1930, poem)
— “The old trail” (1934, poem)
— “The passing of Hinkler” (1933, poem)
— “Poppies of peace: Armistice Day” (1931, poem)
— “Remembrance” (26 Apr 1933, poem)
— “St Patrick’s eve; in Codford Camp; England, 1917” (1930, poem)
— “To my country” (1931, poem)
— [Untitled: Armistice poem] (1932, poem: “They are at peace – at peace – those gallant dead”)

Cross, Zora aka Zora Bernice May Cross, Bernice Smith, Z. C. Bernice May, Adelaide Stree, B May, Mary Glenbrook, Zora C Smith, Rosa Carment and Daisy M. b. 18 May 1890 Eagle Farm, QLD; d. 22 Jan 1964, Glenbrook, NSW. [works in copyright until 2034]
— “A family affair” (1939)
— “Aren’t women cats?” (by “Rosa Carmen”; 1930)
— “Aunt Deborah’s romance” (1930)
— “The brooch” (1938)
— “Christmas Creek” (by “Bernice May”; 1931)
— “Doris Egerton Jones: the woman and her work” (by “Bernice May”; 1930)
— “Edith Sterling Levis” (by “Bernice May”; 1930)
— “The experiment” (1930)
— “Good Australians” (1933)
— “Island fever” (by “Rosa Carmen”; 1930)
— “Jean Devanny” (by “Bernice May”; 1930)
— “The lady of a thousand songs” (by “Rosa Carmen”; 1930)
— “The lonely guest” (1931, short story)
— “Nina Lowe” (by “Bernice May”; 1930)
— “Norma L Davis” (by “Bernice May”; 1931)
— “The portrait” (1938)
— “The punch of Kampape” (1930)
— “The ‘song-makers’: a worthwhile book of verse by Nora McAuliffe” (1938, review)
— “The swamp” (1938)
— “This love business” (1930)
— “White Australia” (1930)
— “Writer and librarian: a long-distance talk with Gertrude Hart” (by Bernice May; 1930)

Curran, Margaret, birth name: Margaret Toohey; b. [1877] Colinton, Qld; d. 1962, Toowoomba, Qld.
— “Ephemeral” (1933, poem)
— “Women in public life” (1930, prose)

Dalziel, Kathleen, birth name: Laura Kathleen Natalie Walker, aka K Dalziel, Kathleen Womersley, Kathleen Walker; b. 1881, Durban, SA; d. 1969, Ivanhoe, Vic; arrived in Australia c. 1887. In the 1930s, writing as “K Dalziel” and “Kathleen Dalziel”, Dalziel had a number of poems published in The Sydney morning heraldThe Australian woman’s mirror, The Australasian, The weekly timesThe Sydney mail, Brisbane courier and elsewhere. (AustLit database lists over 400 works in total for Dalziel in total.) Her poem, “The plum tree”, was accepted for inclusion in The world’s fair anthology (1939; ref).
— “A mood” (1932, poem)
— “The abandoned homestead” (1931, poem)
— “After all” (1931, poem)
— “At the tram stop” (1936, poem)
— “August” (1939, poem)
— “Blackberry harvest” (1938, poem)
— “Daybreak in the bush” (1938, poem)
— “Finis” (1930, poem)
— “Fires” (1930, poem)
— “The forest” (1932, poem; scroll down to view)
— “Graves of the pioneers” (1930, poem)
— “Grey afternoon” (1933, poem)
— “If” (1930, poem)
— “If [2]” (1939, poem)
— “The last time” (1931, poem)
— “Loneliness” (1930, poem)
— “The lilac tree” (1931, poem)
— “The little hour” (1930, poem)
— “The mahogany ship” (1930, poem; “In 1837 the skeleton of a mahogany ship was seen lying on the sand dunes at Warrnambool. the sand drifted over her, and subsequent efforts to find the remains of the vessel have failed.”)
— “Mimosa” (1936, poem)
— “Monotony” (1930, poem)
— “The mountain” (1931, poem)
— “On the headlands” (1932, poem)
— “The other woman” (1932, poem)
— “Past forty” (1932, poem)
— “Prescience” (1931, poem)
— “Rain” (1930, poem)
— “Rain on the dust” (1931, poem)
— “Rivals” (1930, poem)
— “The rock” (1930, poem)
— “Virginia creeper” (1930, poem)
— “White midnight” (1932, poem)
— “Wife-of-all-work” (1931, poem)

Daskein, Tarella Quin, aka Mrs Daskein; birth name: Tarella Ruth Quin; aka James Dare; James Adare; Tarella Quin Daskein. b. 1877, Wilcannia, NSW; d. 1934 Author biography from The World News in 1913. Quin wrote many novels and collections, many of which are not available online but maybe accessed via SLNSW. [work out of copyright]
— “The camel” (1935, prose; “tells of a strange terror”)
— “Talking of ghosts: a short story” (1936)

De Conlay, Olive b. 1882, Warwick, Qld; d. 16 Oct 1935, Warwich Qld; Obituary (21 Oct 1935); member of the Sabbath School staff of St Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Warwick (ref).
— “A woman has her pride” (1931, short story)
— “After many years” (1930, short story)
— “Christmas at the corner” (1933, short story)
— “Heaven For two” (1930, short story)
— “Her last tramp” (1930, short story)
— “The hero” (1934, short story)
— “How Christmas came to the Smiths” (1931, short story)
— “It was Anzac Day, a lonely mother wiped her tears away” (1932, short story)
— “The missing codicil” (1933, short story)
— “Polyanthus for Polly Ann” (1931, short story)
— “Shopping for Ethel” (1931, short story)
— “Sweet William” (1932, short story)
— “Their beano” (1930, short story)
— “The transformation” (1934, short story)
— “The tunic, miracle worker, Anzac Day memory” (1931, short story)
— “The wreath” (1930, short story)

De Mole, Evelyn b. 1875 SA; d. 1953
For the young in heart (1936, poetry collection; children’s)

Deamer, Dulcie* aka Mary Elizabeth Kathleen Dulcie Deamer, Dulcie Goldie. b.1890; d.1972.
— “A dark wave breaks” (1934, short story)
— “A love-story of Babylon” (1930, short story)
— “The bride of the laughing ghost” (1931, short story)
— “The empty house” (1932, short story)
— “The end of the masquerade” (1932, short story)
— “The greater marriage” (1930, short story)
— “Lavinia’s birthday” (1931, short story)
— “The man who was not afraid” (1931, short story)
— “The sirens” (1931, short story)
— “Young orpheus” (1931, short story)

Doyle, Ruby Mary; aka Ruby Doyle, Ruby M Doyle b. 1887, Gunnedah, NSW; d. c1943, England
— “A little bit of England” (1938, prose)
— “A trip to the Bulga: Ellenborough Falls” (1931, prose)
— “An English spring” (1939, prose)
— “Back to Bandon” (1931, short story)
— “Black Head” (1931, prose)
— “Bliss House” (1931, short story)
— “Boating on the Barrington” (1931, prose)
— “The bridge” (1934, short story)
— “The bush fires” (1939, short story)
— “The CWA: a country sketch” (1930, prose)
— “Dungog on the Williams” (1930, prose; “Glimpses of Country Life” series)
— “The English garden” (1938, prose)
— “The flame” (1935)
— “Gambler’s luck” (1930, short story)
— “Gresford, on the Patterson” (1931, prose)
— “Hans Anderson’s love story” (1930, prose)
— “His relations” (1930, short story)
— “The Hunter River” (1930, prose)
— “Ideal gardens at Olympia” (1938, prose)
— “Inheritance” (1938, serialised in Weekly Times): 30Jul; 6Aug; 13Aug
.— “The invisible guest” (1934, short story)
— “The little corner shops of London” (1938, prose)
— “The long white road” (1930, short story)
— “The magpie’s nest” (1931, short story)
— “The mist” (1931, short story)
— “Mountain beauty” (1931, prose)
— “Mr Browning” (1935, short story)
— “The old house” (1935, short story)
— “Olympia: the greatest exhibition in the world” (1938, prose)
— “The orange feather” (1938, short story)
— “The orchard” (1930, short story)
— “The parlour” (1931, short story)
— “The peaceful beauty of Dungog” (1933; prose; “Glimpses of Country Life” series)
— “Peggy O’Shannon” (1934, short story)
— “The precipice” (1930, short story)
— “River song” (1939, prose)
— “Sally” (1930, short story)
— “The seance” (1931, short story)
Sleepy hollow (1931, novella serialised in The Wingham Chronicle): 12Jun; 19Jun; 26Jun; 3Jul; 10Jul; 17Jul; 24Jul; 31Jul; 7Aug; 14Aug; 21Aug; [28Aug no instalment]; 4Sep; 11Sep; 18Sep; 2Oct (ch15); 9Oct; 16Oct; 23Oct (ch16); 6Nov; 13Nov; 20Nov; 27Nov; 4Dec; 11Dec; 18Dec; 22Dec; 29Dec: missing issue.
— “Snow” (1939, prose)
— “Snow on the ranges” (1936, short story)
— “Spring cleaning” (1930, prose; humour)
— “Spring magic” (1931, short story)
— “Summer moon” (1935, short story)
— “The transformation of an old country home” (1930, prose)
— “The valley train” (1934, short story)
— “Victoria Road: In Kensington, London” (1938, prose)
— “Wattle Creek swank” (1931, short story)
— “The whip hand” (1931, short story)

Drake-Brockman, Henrietta.*
The Disquieting Sex, serialised in Table Talk 1930 (first chapter); republished in The Swan Express 20 June 1946 and available on Trove (first chapter).

Drew, Dene; birth name: Christina Wilhelmina Kirkham; Mrs G W Kendrew of Bute, SA b. 1864 d. 1949 (Note: Drew published several more journalistic pieces in the 1930s not listed here.)
— “A back number” (1932, short story)
— “A millionaire’s daughter” (1931, short story)
— “A practical joke” (1934, short story)
— “A summer idyll” (1934, short story)
— “An old garden” (1936, prose)
— “Aunt Alison’s fortune” (1938, short story)
— “Carissima: the story of a song” (1935, short story): 17 May; 24 May; 31 May; 7 Jun; 14 Jun; 21 Jun; 28 Jun; 5 Jul; 12 Jul; 19 Jul; 26 Jul; 2 Aug;
— “The Christmas guest” (1932, short story)
— “Christmas roses” (1931, short story)
— “The coming of Marigold” (1932, short story)
— “Cousins” (1933, short story)
— “The dream of Pilate’s Wife” (1934, short story; Easter theme)
— “Dreams” (1936, prose)
— “Friendship” (1938, prose)
— “Home” (1938, prose)
— “I shall not pass this way again” (1939, prose)
— “Illusions dispelled” (1936, short story)
— “Kathleen Mavourneen” (1933, short story)
— “Never mind” (1937, prose)
— “Opportunities” (1938, prose)
— “The reminiscences of a half-crown” (1936, short story)
— “The resident doctor” (1930, short story)
— “The ruby necklace” (1933, short story)
— “Temperance: the Christmas gift” (1933, prose)
— “Their first Christmas” (1932, short story)
— “Twixt cup and lip: short Christmas story” (1936, short story)
— “Two Christmases” (1933, short story)
— “Under the umbrella” (1936, short story)
— “Until seventy times seven” (1933, short story)
— “The wallet” (1935, short story): 11 Oct; 18 Oct.
— “Wanted, a wife” (1938, short story)
— “Winifred’s Christmas gifts” (1930, short story)

Dunn, Annie Powis aka Annie Elizabeth Powis Dunn, Powis, “An Australian Mother”. Birth name: Annie Jordan; b. 1863, Bristol, England; d. 1936 Brisbane, QLD. Obituary: The Telegraph, 8 Apr 1936: 2. Mentioned very briefly in a review of Henry Arthur Kellow’s Queensland Poets 4 Oct 1930. Biographical snippet, The Queenslander 21 Feb 1935.
— “Flowers at play” (1930, poem)
— “Historic newstead” (1934, Letter to the Editor)
— “Lovely-land” (1930, poem)
— “The mantis” (1930, poem)
— Report of Powis’ extract from the memoirs of her mother, Mrs Henry Jordan, Sunday Mail 16 Dec 1934; further recollections 5 May 1935;
— “Suppose” (1930, poem)

Eades, M. L. birth name Maud Louise Henniker; aka Maud Louise Eades; M Henniker Andrews; b. 29 Mar 1874, Port Adelaide, SA; d. 1949, England; departed Australia c. 1901.
The Torrington Square mystery (1934, novella in The Advocate [Burnie, Tas]): 15 Jun; 16 Jun; 18 Jun; 19 Jun; 20 Jun; 21 Jun; 22 Jun; 23 Jun; 25 Jun; 26 Jun; 27 Jun; 28 Jun; 29 Jun; 30 Jun; 2 Jul; 3 Jul; 4 Jul; 5 Jul; 6 Jul; 7 Jul; 9 Jul; 10 Jul; 11 Jul; 12 Jul; 13 Jul; 14 Jul; 16 Jul; 17 Jul; 18 Jul; 19 Jul; 20 Jul; 23 Jul; 24 Jul.

Eldershaw, M Barnard (writing name for Flora Eldershaw 191897-1956) and Marjorie Barnard (1897-1987)
— “Christina Stead” (1937, criticism)
— “Eleanor Dark” (1937, criticism)
Essays in Australian fiction (1938; rep 1970, criticism) – link to Open Library, access conditions apply (sign up as member to borrow by the hour, free) – collects essays published elsewhere
— “Henry Handel Richardson” (1937, criticism)

Ercole, Velia** aka Velia Gregory, Margaret Gregory b.1893; d. 1978 [copyright until 2048]
— “A kingdom for Lily Skinner” (1931, short story) in McLean’s, July 1931: available online for fee.
— “A wise old bird is a pelican: a complete story” (1936, short story) in Table Talk, 12/11/1936.
Accident” (1934, short story) in Table Talk, 29/03/1934.
— “Art and Elizabeth”, (1939, short story) in Maclean’s, 01/08/1938, available online for fee.
The beggar“, (1932, short story) in Smith’s Weekly, 09/04/1932.
Breakfast after ten years” (1932, short story) inTable Talk, 31/03/1932.
— “Brief discontent“, (1935, short story) in Maclean’s, 01/04/1935, also Table Talk, 03/09/1936 (p13).
— “Bernie McCurley’s kink” (1937, short story)
— “Blackmail” (1937, short story)
— “Companion-help”, (1936, short story) in Maclean’s, 15/05/1936 (p24), available for fee; also GRIT: story section, Feb 1944.
Cora and the rich man“, (1925, short story) The Spokesman Review 02/02/1935. Also published in Table Talk, 02/07/1936.
— “The folly of being wise“, Table Talk, 03/05/1934.
Fool’s chance, the home: an Australian quarterly (1932).
— “Gay comrades” (1932, short story)
— “Glamor” (1933, short story), 06/04/1933, Table Talk.
— “Going to Kenya” (1931, short story), Macleans, 15/09/1931, also Table Talk, 14/03/1932.
— “Greatest gain“, (1936, short story in Table Talk)
— “Half-and-hour“, (1932) Table Talk 2 Jun 1932: pp19-; very poor scan quality in Trove.
— “Humoresque” (1932, short story)
— “Imprisoned“, (1932) Table Talk, 28/04/1932.
— “Mamie dines out” (1933, short story humour)
Marriage made on earth, (1939) published as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove.
— “Marriage song“, (1934) Table Talk, 31/05/1934.
— “Miss Mafflin” (1932, short story)
— “Nineteen and she’d met a man” (1933, short story) in Table Talk, 29/09/1933.
— “No escape” (1931, short story/novella): ch1 (Jan21); ch2 (Jan 28); ch2 (cont.) 4 Feb; ch3 (cont.) 11 Feb; ch4 (cont.) 18 Feb; ch4 (cont.) 28 Feb; ch5 (cont.) 4 Mar; ch5 (cont.) 11 Mar; ch5 (cont.) 18 Mar; ch6 (cont.) 26 Mar; ch6 (cont.) 1 Apr; ch7 (cont.) 8 Apr; ch8 (cont.) 15 Apr; ch9 (cont.) 22 Apr; ch9 (cont.) 29 Apr; ch10 (cont.) 6 May; ch11 13 May; ch11 (cont.) 20 May, final. Quote in “Said About Women”, The Australian Women’s Mirror: “Not all women have the chance of undertaking marriage. And often it fails them. Then they starve or are dependent on relatives. Or they become lady helps. – Olwen Ferrars in No Escape.”
— “Noise in the night” (1936, short story) in Table Talk, 16/07/1936.
— “Nothing else serious” (1937, short story), in Table Talk, 03/06/1937. Might also have been published as “Millicent’s Best Interests”, in Woman’s Home Companion, Oct 1937.
— “The wife of a genius” (1932, short story) inTable Talk, 15/09/1932.

Evans, Nellie A, aka Nellie Alice Evans, “Gyspy”; b. 1884, Goulburn, NSW; d. 1944.Evans’ work was widely published during the 1930s, including poems in the early 1930s in The Bulletin; poems and some prose throughout the 1930s in The sun (Sydney), The Sydney morning herald (including for children), The Daily Telegraph (Sydney); Australian women’s weekly; Sydney Mail; The advocate (Burnie, Tas), The North Western Courier (Narrabri, NSW), Smith’s weekly (Sydney), The world news (Sydney) and elsewhere. In 1934, Evans received a pension from the Commonwealth Literary Fund of 10s a week for a period of five years (ref). Obituary 1944.
— “Christmas of hope” (1934, poem)
— “The poet of the people” (1938, poem; on Henry Lawson)
— “Paddington: some of its early history” (1930, prose)
— “Travail” (1935, short story)
— “The word witch” (1937, poem)

Fane, Margaret, aka Beatrice Florence Osborne; b. 10 Jan 1887; d. 1962, Brisbane, Qld; Fane was a prolific author who published poetry and short fiction throughout the 1920s under the name “Margaret Fane” in The Australian women’s mirror, The Bulletin and The Sydney mail, (where she often co-authored with Hilary Lofting), and elsewhere. She also published using the pseudonym “Francis Osborn” in The Sydney mail, The bulletin, and The Australian woman’s mirror, a sample of which is listed below.
— “The miser: a story of hope renewed” (1933, short story)
— “Grilled apricots” (1932, short story)
— written with Hilary Lofting, The happy vagabond (1937, novel; published in The Australian women’s weekly; first published 1928)
— “Hessian: a story set in a London dressmaker’s salon” (1932, short story)
— with Hilary Lofting, “The logical conclusion” (1934, short story)
— “The old dope” (1932, short story)
— “The richer gift” (1932, short story)
— “Romantic guff” (1932, short story)
— “Silk” (1934, short story)

Field, Catherine Eliza Somerville: aka Katie Langloch, K. Langloh Parker, Mrs P R Stow, Catherine Somerville, Catherine Field. Birth name: Catherine Eliza Somerville Field. b. 1856 (Encounter Bay, SA), d. 1940 (Glenelg, SA).
— “Bootoolgah, the crane, and goonur, the kangaroo rat, the fire-makers” (1932, short story)

Finlay, birth name: Mary Ellen Moroney; aka Mary Eileen Finlay, Mollie Eileen Moroney; Mary Eileen Fortescue; and Mrs E F Boswarrick. b. 16 Oct 1878, Maffra, Vic; d. 12 Jun 1950, Melbourne Vic; married in 1899; death notice 14 Jun 1950. [Note: a number of her novels are available in print at SLNSW]
— “Echoes of Melba: an old man’s idyll” (1937, prose)
— “The little church of memories” (1938, prose)
— “Memories of McVeigh: ‘I allus ‘as one at eleven’” (1937, prose)

Finn, Mary Agnes b. c1860, Vic; d. Randwick, NSW 1948
A strange destiny (1930, serialised in The Catholic Press): 16 Jan; 23 Jan; 30 Jan; 6 Feb; 13 Feb; 20 Feb; 6 Mar; 13 Mar; 20 Mar; 27 Mar; 3 Apr; 10 Apr.
Clifton Manor (1939, serialised in The Catholic Press): 11 May; 18 May; 25 May; 1 Jun; 8 Jun; 15 Jun; 22 Jun; 29 Jun; 6 Jul; 13 Jul; 20 Jul; 27 Jul; 3 Aug; 10 Aug; 17 Aug; 24 Aug.

Forrest, Mabel, birth name: Helena Mabel Checkly Mills; aka M Forrest, Mabel Burkinshaw, Helena Mabel Checkley Forrest; also writes as M Burkinshaw, M Burkershaw, Helena M C Mills, M. R., and “Reca”. [Sister of Ethel Mills.]  b. 6 Mar 1872 Yandilla, Qld; d. 18 Mar 1935, Brisbane, Qld. Courier-Mail obituary (19 Mar 1935; with photo); SMH obituary (19 Mar 1935). During the 1930s, writing as “M Forrest”, the author published extensively in The Australasian, as well as in numerous other publications. A full list can be found in the AustLit database (access requires log in via library membership or subscription).
— “Careless authors” (1933, corresopondence)
— “The city hall” (1930, poem)
— “Danny boy: a mountain top romance” (1931, short story)
— “Love’s pauper” (1935, lyrics set to the music of Edna McClelland)
— “M Forrest testimonial” (1934, correspondence)
— “Shaw Nielson” (1934, correspondence)
— “The snake man” (1931, novel serialised in The Daily Telegraph: “‘The, Snake Man’ is a story of life on a Queensland station and on the northern pearling coast”): 12 Jun; 13 Jun; 15 Jun; 16 Jun; 17 Jun; 18 Jun; 19 Jun; 20 Jun; 22 Jun; 23 Jun; 24 Jun; 25 Jun; 26 Jun; 27 Jun; 29 Jun; 30 Jun; 1 Jul; 2 Jul; 3 Jul; 4 Jul; 6 Jul; 7 Jul; 8 Jul; 9 Jul; 10 Jul; 11 Jul; 13 Jul; 14 Jul; 15 Jul; 16 Jul; 17 Jul; 18 Jul; 20 Jul; 21 Jul; 22 Jul; 23 Jul; 24 Jul; 25 Jul; 27 Jul; 28 Jul; 29 Jul; 30 Jul; 31 Jul; 1 Aug; 3 Aug; 4 Aug; 5 Aug; 6 Aug; 7 Aug; 8 Aug; 10 Aug; 11 Aug; 12 Aug; 13 Aug; 14 Aug; 15 Aug; 17 Aug; 18 Aug; 19 Aug (final).

Francis, Nancy aka Nancy C Francis, “Black Bonnet” b. 1873, England; d. 1954, Herberton, Qld; arrived in Australia c. 1910. Francis published many journalistic pieces in the Cairns Post (Qld) throughout the 1930s, including a series on “The Anglican church in North Queensland“. Other pieces published by Francis during this decade include:
— “Another day” (1937, poem)
— “The black snake” (1935, short story)
— “The Bloomfield – then and now” (1932, prose)
— “Boats in the bay” (1937, short story)
— “Captain James Cook: from Trinity Bay to Cooktown” (1933, prose)
— “Caught” (1934, poem)
— “City in pastel shades” (1938, prose)
— “Cricket in the rain” (1938, prose)
— “The fury of a cyclone” (1933, prose)
— “God in the jungle” (1933, poem)
— “The great wealthy north” (1931, prose)
— “The gum boots” (1931, short story)
— “I dream of violets” (1934, poem)
— “The last post: Anzac Day, 1937” (1937, poem)
— “Lost in the jungle” (1937, prose)
— “My northern home” (1939, poem)
— “Peace – and a lake or two” (1938, prose)
— “The road of tragedy: grim, unsolved crimes of the Black Mountains of the Palmer” (1933, prose)
— “Sea journey” (1938, prose)
— “Sleeping out – full moon” (1937, short story)
— “Songs of our own land: Cedar Bay” (1932, poem)
— “The story of a mutton chop” (1938, prose)
— “Time for playing” (1938, prose)

Franklin, Miles birth name: Stella Maria Sarah Miles Franklin, aka Stella Franklin; also writes as Brent of Bin Bin; Mr and Mrs Ogniblat L’Artsau, William Black, S.M.S, Stella Lampe, Vernacular, Sarah Mills, Sarah Miles, An Old Bachelor, The Glowworm, Field Hospital Orderly; b. 14 Oct 1879, Talbingo, NSW; d. 19 Sep 1954, Drummoyne, NSW; departed from Australia in 1906 and lived for a time in Chicago.
— “All that swagger” (1936, serialised in The Bulletin): 16 Sep; 23 Sep; 30 Sep; 7 Oct; 14 Oct; 21 Oct; 28 Oct; 4 Nov (final).
— “Australians do not exist” (1937, column)
Back To Bool Bool (1931, novel) – link to Colonial Australian Popular Fiction Digital Archive
— “Crowded canvases” (1936, column)
— “Such Is colonialism” (1937, criticism)

Fullerton, Mary Eliza aka Robert Gray, Turner O Lingo, Gordon Manners, “E”, Alpenstock, “Owen Roe O’Neill, “L”, Joseph Marizeeni (1868-1946). [works out of copyright] A prolific author whose full title list can be found at AustLit (subscription or access via library). [works out of copyright]

Gibbs, May, birth name: Cecilia May Gibbs; aka Cecilia May Ossoli Kelly; also writes as Blob, Stan Cottman; b. 17 Jan 1877, Kent, England; d. 27 Nov 1969, Sydney NSW; arrived in Australia 1881
— “Bill and Bub” (1938, in Mail [Adelaide]: “Word and Pictures” for children) – note, Gibbs published a regular comic strip in the 1930s which can be found on Trove.
— “The finding of Little Obelia” (1930, short story in School Magazine from “Ragged Blossom and more about Snugglepot and Cuddlepie”)
— “Rescued” (1933, short story in School Magazine from “Little Obelia and the further adventures of Ragged Blossom”, “slightly simplified”)
— “Snugglepot and Ragged Blossom” (1935, short story in School Magazine from “Little Ragged Blossom”): 1 Sep; 1 Oct.

Gilmore, Mary; birth name: Mary Jean Cameron; b. 1865; d. 1962; Mary Gilmore was a prolific writer who published over many decades. A full list of her works can be found at AustLit (subscription or free access via library membership).
— “Aboriginal science: fish traps and fish balks” (1933, prose)
— “Don’t quit” (1934, poem)
— “From merry me” (1934, poem)
— “If only we could” (1933, poem)
— “In the years of the lamplighter” (1936, poem)
— “The jewel” (1934, poem; “from Under the Wilgas”)
— “Love of freedom” (1930, poem)
— “‘Merryvale’ poplar: tree that speaks history” (1936, prose)

Gittins, Constance birth name: Constance Laura Doughty; aka Constance Laura Doughty Gittins, Mrs T Gittins Jnr, Connie Gittins; also writes as Constance L D Smith; born 25 Jun 1875, Gympie QLD; d. 1963, Bowral NSW
— “A lighted window” (1933, prose snippet)
— “Christmas morn” (1930, poem)
— “The comforter” (1930, poem)
— “For healing” (1939, poem)
— “For peace: Armistice Day” (1933, poem)
— “Forging link, memory’s chain, a little white hand” (1930, prose)
— “From the dust: an Easter thought” (1933, poem)
— “Grace of motherhood” (1934, poem)
— “Late autumn” (1934, poem)
— “My sea” (1936, poem)
— “Seascape: diamond-decked hour” (1930, prose)
— “Snow on the border” (1935, poem; about Stanthorpe)
— “Spring tryst” (1930, poem)
— “The spent day” (1932, poem)
— “The storm kiss’s ride” (1931, poem)
— “The Sunday Mail of wings” (1934, poem)
— “To you – in Brisbane” (1935, poem)
— “The virgin new year” (1934, poem)

Gore-Jones, Alice aka A Gore-Jones; b. 29 May 1887, Toowong, Qld; d. 26 Jul 1961, Brisbane, Qld. In the 1930s, Gore-Jones continued to published in The bulletin, The Australian woman’s mirror, The Sydney mail, and elsewhere.
— “Adieu” (1935, poem)
— “Candlesticks” (1936, poem)
— “Crysanthemums” (1934, poem)
— “Curios” (1936, poem)
— “Evening light” (1933, poem)
— “Holiday house” (1931, poem)
— “Interlude” (1938, poem)
— “June” (1933, poem)
— “Lavender lady” (1932, poem)
— “Melody” (1936, poem)
— “The passing” (1934, poem)
— “Requiem” (1936, poem)
— “Sea song” (1930, poem)
— “The shoppers” (1932, poem)
— “Silhouette” (1932, poem)
— “Song of the months” (1937, poem)
— “Sonnet of flowers” (1934, poem)
— “Untamed” (1934, poem)
— “Week end” (1934, poem)

Gornall, Lola, b. 1884, Sydney, NSW; d. 1969, Sydney, NSW.
— “April” (1930, poem)
— “At Pymble” (1930, poem)
— “The bird shop” (1930, poem)
— “Brisbane” (1930, poem)
— “Fairy faith” (1930, poem)
— “Girl song” (1931, poem)
— “Heart-break” (1930, poem)
— “Humankind‘ (1930, poem)
— “If – but –” (1930, poem)
— “Jewels” (1930, poem)
— “Night – Kangaroo Point” (1930, poem)
— “Pearls for tears” (1930, poem)
— “The pirate” (1934, poem for children)
— “Surf siren” (1930, poem)
— “Sydney” (1930, poem)
— “The thread” (1932, poem)
— “Vale, summer!” (1930, poem)

Grant, Isabel aka Isabella Grant, Isabel Murray. b. c1870, Scotland; d. 1952, Bundaberg, QLD.
— “An interesting case” (1933)

Gregory, Ada Leonora (1873-1935).
The clouded dream : a story of two incarnations, J.R. Price, Melbourne, 1938, 18 pp. Downloadable here.

Grimshaw, Beatrice.**
— “Away from it all” (1936, short story)
— “Eyes of pearl” (1935, short story)
— “House enchanted” (1939, short story)
— “The jasmine balcony” (1936, story)
— “Little men of Lolok” (1939, short story)
Lost behind the ranges” (1935; story)
— “The Maid of Niu-Niu” (1935, story)
My South Sea Sweetheart
, originally published London: Mills & Boon 1922; republished 14 May 1938 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove.
Nor-west Jane” (1939, short story)
Victorian Family Robinson (1935; romance and comedy)

Gunn, Mrs Aeneas birth name: Jeannie Taylor; aka Jeannie Gunn; born 5 Jun 1870, Carlton, Vic; d. 9 Jun 1961, Hawthorn, Vic.
— “The little black princess” (1937, correspondence published in The Bulletin)

Hart, Gertrude aka E Gertrude Hart; Ethel Gertrude Hart, “E. G. H.” and “T. L. O. A.” b. 1873 Vic; d. 1965
— “Aunt Sanderson’s tent” (1936, short story)
— “Biddy steps in” (1935, short story for children serialised in The Australasian): 4 May; 11 May; 18 May; 25 May; 1 Jun; 8 Jun; 15 Jun; 22 Jun; 29 Jun; 6 Jul; 13 Jul; 20 Jul; 27 Jul; 3 Aug; 10 Aug.
— “The big house” (1936, short story)
— “Blossom Row” (1936, short story)
— “The cattery” (1933, short story)
— “The Christmas ghost” (1936, short story)
Chubby (1937)
Chubby and Pip (1937)
“The crooked road” (1930, short story serialised in The Herald [Melbourne]; faint print): 2 Aug; 4 Aug; 5 Aug; 6 Aug; 7 Aug; 8 Aug; 9 Aug; 11 Aug; 12 Aug; 13 Aug; 14 Aug; 15 Aug; 16 Aug; 18 Aug; 19 Aug; 20 Aug; 21 Aug; 22 Aug; 23 Aug; 25 Aug; 26 Aug; 27 Aug; 28 Aug; 29 Aug; 30 Aug; 1 Sep; 2 Sep; 3 Sep; 4 Sep; 5 Sep; 6 Sep; 8 Sep; 9 Sep; 10 Sep; 11 Sep; 12 Sep;
Cutting out Christmas” (1937, short story)
The extra sense” (1930, short story; in Weekly Times faint scan)
— “First foot” (1937, short story)
Following Candlish” (1935, short story)
Four roads inn” (1934-35, short story serialised in Weekly Times [Melbourne]): 3 Nov; 10 Nov; 17 Nov; 24 Nov; 1 Dec; 8 Dec; 15 Dec; 22 Dec; 29 Dec; 5 Jan; 12 Jan; 19 Jan; 26 Jan; 2 Feb; 9 Feb; 16 Feb; 23 Feb (final).
Fugitive” (1936, poem)
— “The grandfather clock” (1931, short story)
The handy man” (1937, short story)
The haunted hut” (1934, short story)
Himself” (1936, short story)
— “The House Is Haunted” (1939, review)
— “I know the rose” (1938, song/lyric)
— “The lonely chair” (1935, short story)
— “Mallee song” (1930, poem)
— “The man from the country” (1931, short story)
— “Martha goes to town” (1930, short story)
— “Miss Prymme’s permanent” (1933, short story)
— “Mrs Next-door” (1937, short story)
— “Our shop” (1932, short story)
— “Paddy goes back: a bush fire story” (1931, short story)
— “Prue goes flatting” (1935, short story)
— “The retreat” (1932, short story)
— “Relative importance” (1936, short story)
— “Robin sees life” (1935, short story)
— “Selling a library” (1935, short story)
— “Shadow-show” (1936, poem)
— “The storm centre” (1936, novella): 15 Aug; 22 Aug.
— “Tommy goes on leave” (1936, short story)
— “Tullis Hill” (1935, short story; “Biddy Travers”)
— “Turn of the road” (1936, poem)
— “Two minutes’ silence” (11 Nov 1936, poem)
— “Uninvited guest” (1935, short story)
— “When the rain came” (1939, short story)
— “The yellow dog” (1936, short story)

Heney, L.A.B.** [Lucy Amy Beatrice Heney] b. 1903, Mosman NSW.
The Shadow Tree, (London: Andrew Melrose, 1936; republished 29 January 1938 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel).

Holman, Ada A. Birth name Ada Augusta Kidgell. b. 1869, Ballarat, Vic; d. 1949.
Eve in the desert (1934, serialised in Sydney Morning Herald): 27 Jan; 29 Jan; 30 Jan; 31 Jan; 1 Feb; 2 Feb; 3 Feb; 5 Feb; 6 Feb; 7 Feb; 8 Feb; 10 Feb; 12 Feb; 13 Feb; 14 Feb; 15 Feb; 16 Feb; 17 Feb; 19 Feb; 20 Feb; 21 Feb; 22 Feb; 23 Feb; 24 Feb; 26 Feb; 27 Feb.
— “Gain” (1934, short story)
Good courage (1936, serialised in Sydney Morning Herald): 21 Jul; 23 Jul; 24 Jul; 25 Jul; 27 July; 28 Jul: ch7; 28 Jul: ch8; 29 Jul; 30 Jul; 31 Jul; 1 Aug; 3 Aug; 4 Aug; 5 Aug; 6 Aug; 7 Aug; 8 Aug; 10 Aug; 11 Aug; 12 Aug; 13 Aug; 14 Aug; 15 Aug; 17 Aug; 18 Aug; 19 Aug; 20 Aug; 21 Aug; 22 Aug; 24 Aug; 25 Aug; 26 Aug; 27 Aug: ch31; 27 Aug: ch32; 28 Aug; 29 Aug; 31 Aug: ch34 cont.; 31 Aug: ch35; 1 Sep; 2 Sep; 3 Sep; 4 Sep; 5 Sep; 7 Sep; 8 Sep; 9 Sep; 10 Sep; 11 Sep; 12 Sep; 14 Sep; 15 Sep; 16 Sep; 17 Sep; 18 Sep: ch49 cont.; 18 Sep: ch50 (final).
— “Romance in Australia’s settlement” (1937, lecture “read beofre the Royal Australian Historical Society”; begins with a quote from A House Is Built)

Homfray, Lucy Everett, aka L E Homfray b. 1873, Sydney, NSW; d. 1951, Sydney; sister of a Canon Homfray who resided in Portland, near Lithgow, NSW; ; she wrote hymns to be sung, as well as poetry (ref1; ref2); resided at Lindfield, NSW (ref), Bowral and Beecroft.
— “A song of youth” (1937, poem)
— “Childhood” (1936, poem)
— “Dreams” (1937, poem)
— “From merry me” (1937, poem)
— “If you were me” (1934, poem)
— “Riches” (1934, poem)
— “Some of life’s joys” (1934, poem)
— “Two little hands” (1934, poem)

Honey, Madeleine, aka Lucy Madeleine Honey, “Aunt Roberta”; b. 1886, Paddinton, NSW; d. 1942, Randwich NSW; married William Henry Honey; niece of Ethel Turner. Honey also wrote several books for children, which have not been found online, and edited Youth magazine (Trove listing).
— “A song” (1935, poem)
— “Christmas bush [1]” (1935, poem)
— “Christmas bush [2]” (1935, poem)
— “Coralie Winston’s romance” (1934, short story; illustrated)
— “The end of a perfect day” (1935, prose)
— “The hour of remembrance” (1936, poem)
— “I hold you fast” (1937, poem)
— “In remembrance” (1935, poem)
— “Miracle” (1937, poem)
— “Mr and Mrs Mopoke” (1933, prose)
— “Mrs Tarantula” (1934, prose)
— “One dark night” (1934, short story)
— “Poppies for the dead” (1936, poem)
— “Recompense” (1935, poem)
— “Retrospect” (1936, poem)
— “Shall I sleep?” (1938, poem)
— “This new spring” (1937, poem)
— “The tigress” (1934, short story)
— “Vision” (1937, poem)

House, Mary, birth name: Mary Hewitt; aka Mrs Charles House; b. 23 Dec 1875, Manly, NSW; d. 21 Dec 1950, Rockhampton, Qld. House was a prolific poet and many of her poems were published in The Central Queensland Herald after she won a competition in 1933 (ref).
— “An Australian love song” (1933, poem; faint print)
— “The dreamer” (1931, poem)
— “The little Dawson girl” (1933, poem)

Howitt, Mary E. B. b. 1866; c. 1933
— “The squatter’s papers: Charles Reade on Australia” (1931, prose)

Hughes, Katherine birth name Catherin McNicol; also writes as K H; b. 1871 Wentworth, NSW; d. 22 Sep 1957 Jandowae, QLD [work in copyright until 2027]
— “Amy” (1930, poem; on British aviator Amy Johnson’s flight)
— “Whipcord” (1933, short story)

Hungerford, Alys b. birth name: Alys Hungerford; Mrs Francis John Beamish; Mrs Kenneth Stuart Hungerford; 17 July 1857 at Cahirmore, Rosscarbery, County Cork, Ireland; d. 16 August, 1934 at Lawson (district of Katoomba), NSW
— “The wish” (1931, poem)

Irby, Florence M. b. 1875, Tenterfield, NSW; d. 1964, Port Macquarie NSW; naturalist and resident of Casino NSW
The waggon of birds (1933, novella serialised in The Australian Women’s Mirror): 5 Sep; 12 Sep; 19 Sep; 26 Sep; 3 Oct; 10 Oct (final).

Kearnan, Agnes H b. 1861; d. 1942
Nonette (1930, poetry)

Kelaher, Mary. Birth name Mary Ellen Cross. b. 1895, Moree, NSW; d. 1943, Sydney, NSW.
Lost enchantment (1937-38, novella, serialised in Australian Woman’s Mirror): ch1 (9 Nov); ch5 (16 Nov); ch5 con. (23 Nov); ch7 cont. (30 Nov); (7 Dec); ch11 cont. (14 Dec); ch13 cont. (21 Dec); ch15 cont. (28 Dec); ch16 (4 Jan).
— Security (1931, novella serialised in Australian Woman’s Mirror): ch1 (24 Mar); ch2 cont. (31 Mar); ch4 cont. (7 Apr); ch6 cont. (14 Apr); ch10 cont. (21 Apr); ch11 cont. (28 Apr); ch14 (5 May); ch16 cont. (12 May); ch18 (19 May); ch19 cont. (26 May); ch21 (2 Jun) final.

Knowles, Marion Miller aka Marion Miller, M. M. Knowles; John Desmond, Marion Miller, Aunt Patsy. b. Woods Point, Vic. 8 Aug 1865; d. Camberwell, Vic. 16 Sep 1949). ANDB entry.
Meg of ‘Minadong’ (Melbourne: E A Vidler, 1926)
— “The spitfire” (1926)

Lancaster, G. B. (1873-1945), aka Lyttleton, Edith Joan.
Pageant, Endeavour Press, Sydney, 1933, 407 pp. Downloadable here.

Le Breton, Agatha; birth name: Agatha Magdalen Le Breton; aka Miriam Le Breton; also writes as Miriam Agatha, Henry Somerville, Mickie Daly; b. 28 Jun 1886, Maryborough, Qld; d. 1970, Sydney, NSW. In 1938, along with Constance M le Plastier, Le Breton received the “cross Pro Ecciesia et Pontifice” (ref), more generally known as “the cross of Leo” (ref), in honour of her writing. Throughout the 1930s, Le Breton wrote journalistic pieces for The Catholic press and elsewhere.
— “A Christmas appeal: St Anne’s orphanage, Liverpool” (1937, prose)
— “A First Communion day – in a city parish – 1890-1930” (1930, prose)
— “A gentle old face got in the way – a tale for the times” (1939, prose)
— “The Carmelite sisters – a word of gratitude” (1936, prose)
— “Christmas bells – the child’s opening mind” (1931, prose)
— “Corpus Christi procession: impressive ceremony at Randwick” (1936, prose)
— “Eucharistic love – in the heart of the city – June vignettes” (1934, prose)
— “Eucharistic processions – impressive scenes at Randwick and Kensington” (1936, prose)
Gerry and other stories (1935; short stories for children)
— “The grail’s method of perfecting Catholic women” (1939, prose)
— “The mission at St Mary’s – the order of preachers” (1932, prose)
— “Little lambs of God – St Joseph’s poor school, City” (1936, prose)
— “The sinners’ bell – the call to the mission” (1932, prose)
— “Santa Claus arrives” (1932, prose)
— “St Anthony’s home, Croydon – Christmas time” (1936, prose)

Le Plastrier, Constance Mary aka “Erica”, “Mary Lee” b. 1864; d. 1938
The long way (1931-32, serialised novel)
The secret of Dairmid Castle (1933, serialised novel)
Tempering the steel (1930-31, serialised novel)
The thorny way (1935-36, serialised novel)
The worker in stone (1936-37, serialised novel)

Liston, Ellen (1838-1885). [works out of copyright]
Pioneers: stories, E.A. Harwood, Hassell Press, Adelaide, 1936, 190 pp [published posthumously]

Liston, Maud Renner aka Maud R Liston b. 25 Nov 1875, SA; 3. 30 Sep 1944 Adelaide, SA; biographical note (15 Apr 1932)
— “A child’s vision” (1930, poem)
— “Amelia Barr with variations” (1930, poem)
— “Beauty with peace” (1931, poem)
— “Bohemian days” (1930, poem)
— “Calvary” (1930, poem)
— “Good Friday” (1930, poem)
— “Grainger concerts: a friendly criticism” (1935, correspondence)
— “Margaret Crawford” (1931, poem)
— “In memoriam: Pioneer Taylor” (1932, poem)
— “Model public house: recreation and good fellowship” (1930, correspondence)
— “Model public houses” (1930, correspondence)
— “Model public house [3]” (1930, correspondence)
— “Joan Lowell at school” (1930, prose)
— “Life and poetry” (1931, poem)
— “The Murray flood” (1932, short story)
— “The poems of Emily Dickinson” (1931, criticism)

Little, Maud Isabel aka M. I. Little b. 1876 d. 1961
— “By the courtesy of the Camoans” (1932)
Happy cays in Malacca (1933; novella serialised in The Southern Cross): 7 Apr; 13 Apr; 21 Apr; 28 Apr; 5 May; 12 May; 19 May; 26 May; 2 Jun; 9 Jun (final).
— “Mr Pratt and the piano” (1938, short story)

Littlejohn, Agnes b. 1865; d.1944 Ryde NSW
— “Slumber Song” (1938, lyrics)

Littlejohn, Linda birth name Emma Linda Palmer Teece; aka Mrs Charles T Tilden (ref); sister-in-law of Agnes Littlejohn; b. 11 Dec 1883; d. 21 Mar 1949. Littlejohn was a journalist and feminist who wrote regular articles for Australian women’s weekly in the 1930s, as well as the following short story:
— “A Problem Solved” (1933, short story)
She wrote a book, Life and Lucille (1933), reviewed here.

Lloyd, Mary aka Mary Ellen Lloyd, M.E. Lloyd, Vinegar, Bay Ash, “MEL”, Comrade Mary. Birth name: Mary Ellen Parry; b. Wales, UK; d. Sydney NSW 1962.
— “Maggie Dwyer’s Weddin’ Spree” (1933, short story)
— “The Trials of a Saint’s Wife: A Peep Into Countess Tolstoy’s Diary” (1930, article)

McAdam, Constance, aka Constance Clyde, Clyde Writer, Pen, C. C., C Clyde. b. 1872, Glasgow, Scotland; d. 1951, Brisbane QLD.
— “Change of Heart” (1935)
— “Dr Fairchild’s Sister” (1938, in the “Kensit Stories” series)
— “Evidence by Pantomime” (1938, in the “Kensit Stories” series))
— “Mr Long Retaliates” (1934)
— “The Return of Jack Orton” (1937)
— “The Saucer Case” (1938, in the “Kensit Stories” series)

McAuliffe, Nora aka Nora Kelly b. Dunedin New Zealand; resident of Australia.
— [The Song-Maker and Other Verse (Sydney: Bulletin Newspaper Co, 1937); print copy available SLNSW]

McCrae, Dorothy Frances, aka Mrs C E Perry; Mrs Cecil Perry; also writes as “The Youn ‘Un”, “Moth”, Dorothy Frances Perry. b. 1879, Hawthorn, Vic; died 1937, North Sydney NSW.
— “Vindicated” (1930, short story)

MacDonald, Annie birth name Anne Lowe; aka Mrs Alfred Henry MacDonald; born 1870, Kew, Vic. Married in 1893. MacDonald gave a series of talks on Australian poets at various venues during the 1930s, scripts for which are available at SLNSW. Biographical snippet (24 Nov 1911).
— “Barron Falls, Queensland” (1935, poem)
— “Blue Things” (1935, poem)
— “City of Music” (1935, poem)
— “Euganean Hills” (1935, poem)
— “Lake Eacham, Queensland” (1935, poem)
— “Mabel Forrest” (1935, poem)
— “Miskin’s Falls (Johnstone River, Queensland)” (1935, poem; scroll to view)
— “Mount Hinchinbrook, Queensland” (1935, poem)
— “Myosotis (Forget-me-not)” (1935, poem)
— “November Lilies” (1935, poem)
— “Noon Hushed” (1935, poem)
— “Petra” (1935, poem)
— “Rupert Brooke (Died April 23, 1915)” (1937, poem)
— “Singing Sands” (1935, poem)
— “‘Tis Not So Far!” (1939, poem)
— “The Triumph of Music” (1935, poem)
— “Tumut the Beautiful” (1937, poem)
— “White Water Lilies” (1935, poem)
— “Whitsunday Passage” (1935, poem)
— “Your Gift” (1935, poem)

McFadyen, Ella aka Ella May McFadyen, Ella M’Fadyen, Ellen McFadyen; b. 26 Nov 1887; d. 22 Aug 1976. MacFadyen was a prolific writer (the AustLit database lists over 380 works). Throughout the 1930s she published poems in The Sydney mail, and The Sydney morning herald, several of which were reprinted in regional newspapers. [Work in copyright until 2046]
— “The new magic” (1931, poem)
— “The old cedar trail” (1930, poem)
— “Taronga park” (1930, poem)
— “Trees in paradise” (1934, poem)

Mack, Louise aka Marie Louise Hamilton Mack; Mrs Creed; Mrs Allen Illingworth Leyland; Mrs J P Creed; Mrs J Percy Cred; Mrs Percy Creed; Marie Louise Creed; Felicia Watts; Louise M; M.L.M.; Nerang Minstrel. b 10 Oct 1870 Hobart; d. 23 Nov 1935 Mosman NSW. [work out of copyright]
Eve’s daughter (1933)
— “Father’s voice” (1933; short story, mystery)
— “Jubilee: girls’ high school memories” (1933, prose)
— “Louise Mack’s Diary” (1933; column): 17 June 1933; 24 June; 1 Jul; 8 Jul; 15 Jul.
— [Maiden’s Prayer (Sydney: NSW Bookstall Company, 1934); available in print from SLNSW]
— “Ninety-Mile Beach: memories of a picnic” (1932)
— “Shopelogues: marketing discoveries” (1931, prose)
— “The shortest day: a study from life” (1933, column)
Teens Triumphant (Sydney: P R Stephensen, 1933; young adult novel)
— “Wedding eve” (1931)

Mackellar, Dorothea aka Isolbel Marion Dorothea Mackellar; b. 1 Jul 1885; d. 14 Jan 1968. The AustLit database lists over 300 works for Mackellar. [Work in copyright until 1938]
— “Jean Curlewis” (1930, prose)
— “Up country” (1931, poem; originally published 1911)

MacKinnon, Eleanor aka E MacKinnon; birth name: Eleanor Vokes Irby Addison; b. 1871, Tenterfield NSW; d. 1936, Sydney NSW. Red Cross worker: Memorial (1936)
— “On the Prince’s Highway: old colonial home at Pambula” (1934, prose)
— “Starved for want of right diet: plight of children” (1931, prose)

McLaren, Elizabeth birth name: Ada McKenzie, aka Ada Elizabeth Moore McLaren, “Mrs Jack McLaren”, Ada Mackenzie Moore; b. 1887, Bendigo, Vic: d. 1946 London, England; most of McLaren’s poems were published in The Catholic Press.
— “Onward, working comrades” (1932, poem)

McNutt, M. E. birth name: Mary E Shaw; aka Mollie E McNutt, Mollie M’Nutt; b. 23 Mar 1885, West Mailand, NSW; d. 26 Feb 1919, Torrington, NSW; obituary 5 Mar 1919 (ref). Many of her poems were published posthumously in the 1920s and later in School Magazine, and one piece in 1930s:
— “The legend of the wattle” (1935, prose)
Maley, Lewese (a.k.a. Lawese Maley) b. 1870; d. 1943; birth name Lewese Nielson; death notice; Victorian and Western Australian author
— “The Little Brick Cottage” (1930, short story)

Marc, Elizabeth birth name Elsie Penn Algar, aka Elizabeth Mostyn; Elsie Penn Mostyn; writes as Princess Nusrat Ali Mirza; b. 1882 Kent, Eng; d. 1964, NSW; arrived in Australian 1927
Bush Ragamuffins (1935)

Mark, Annie H aka Annie Hetherinton Mark; also writes as Annie Hetherington Coxon; b. 1875, Cumberland, Cumbria, England; d. 1947; arrived in Australia 1911
— “Birds” (1932, poem)
— “Contentment” (1932, poem)
“Odds and ends” (1930, poem)
— “The scarlet thread” (1933, poem)
— [Untitled: for Robert Burns anniversary: “He lies within a common grave”] (1932, poem; scroll to view).

Martyr, Grace Ethel aka G E Martyr, E Martyr, Ethel Martyr, G Ethel Martyr; b. 1888, Ballarat, Vic; d. 22 Dec 1934, Bendigo. Biographical note (29 Dec 1934):

The death occurred at Bendigo on Saturday of Miss Grace Ethel Martyr, who was well known as a poetess and authoress. She had carried out. her duties as social editress of the Bendigo “Advertiser” up to a week before her death. Miss Martyr, who was a daughter of Mrs. Martyr and the late Mr. J. K. Martyr, was born in Ballarat. Many of Miss Martyr’s stories and verses were devoted to children and their interests. She was also a talented pianist, and had delivered lectures in Bendigo on the works of the fireat masters. (ref)

— “A breath of air” (1934, short story)
— “A message” (1930, poem)
— “A seed” (1933, poem)
— “The apple tree” (1930, novella for children serialised in The Australasian)
— “Armistice Day” (1935, poem)
— “Autumn” (1934, poem)
— “Autumn wind” (1930, poem)
— “Barbara” (1932, short story)
— “Bare trees” (1933, poem)
— “Bird song” (1931, poem)
— “Escape” (1932, short story)
— “Evening” (1932, poem)
— “Fairy Gold” (1932, novella for children serialised in The Australasian)
— “Green timber” (1930, novella for children serialised in Weekly times)
— “Growing things” (1932, poem)
— “The happy island” (1932, novella for children serialised in The Australasian)
— “Happy song” (1936, poem; published posthumously)
— “Isn’t it fun?” (1933, poem)
— “John’s wonder week” (1936, novella for children serialised in Mercury [Hobart]; first appeared in The argus [Melbourne], but scan too faint to read)
— “Johnson’s wireless” (1930, short story)
— “The keeper of the bridge” (1930, short story)
— “The long lane” (1931, short story)
— “New curtains” (1936, poem; published posthumously; “[These] verses were written for the Y.F.P. by the late Miss Ethel Martyr, and sent to us recently by her mother. Miss Martyr will be remembered by a great many readers as the author of many of our best-loved serial stories and poems.”)
— “Night noises” (1932, poem)
— “Philip Island memories” (1930, prose)
— “Rain” (1930, poem)
— “Resurgent” (1933, poem)
— “Silver speech” (1930, short story)
— “Summer months” (1934, short story)
— “Thistles” (1930, poem)
— “The threshold” (1937, story in two parts: “One of the best stories ever written of life in the ‘fifties appears in this week’s issue of The Weekly Times. Named ‘The Threshold,’ it is written by Ethel Martyr, and deals with life on the Bendigo ‘ goldfields in a manner which cannot, fall, to hold the Interest of all lovers of historical romance.” ref): 22 May; 29 May.
— “Trees in winter” (1932, poem)
— “Truants” (1930, poem)
— “Twelve by the clock” (1936, short story)
— “Wattle” (1930, poem)
— “Who is calling?” (1931, poem)
— “The yacht” (1931, poem)
— “Young autumn” (1930, poem)

Meagher, Alice b. 1872; d. 1953
— Cranstoun of Teviotdale: a tale of the sixties (1934, novellla; serialised – weekdays only? – in The Age): 11 Jan; 12 Jan; Sat 13 Jan; 15 Jan; 16 Jan; 17 Jan; 18 Jan; 19 Jan; Sat 20 Jan; 22 Jan; 23 Jan; 24 Jan; 25 Jan; 26 Jan; Sat 27 Jan; 29 Jan; 30 Jan; 31Jan; 1 Feb; 2 Feb; Sat 3 Feb; 5 Feb; 6 Feb; 7 Feb; 8 Feb; 9 Feb; Sat 10 Feb; 12 Feb, 13 Feb; 14 Feb; 15 Feb; 16 Feb; Sat 17 Feb; 19 Feb; 20 Feb; 21 Feb; 22 Feb; 23 Feb; Sat 24 Feb; 26 Feb; 27 Feb; 28 Feb; 1 Mar; 2 Mar; Sat 3 Mar; 5 Mar; 6 Mar; 7 Mar; 8 Mar; 9 Mar; Sat 10 Mar; 12 Mar.
— Fortuna City (1939, novella; serialised in The Age): 3 Jun; 5 Jun; 6 Jun; 7 Jun; 8 Jun; 9 Jun; 10 Jun; 12 Jun; 13 Jun; 14 Jun; 15 Jun; 16 Jun; 17 Jun; 19 Jun; 20 Jun; 21 Jun; 22 Jun; 23 Jun; 24 Jun; 26 Jun; 27 Jun; 28 Jun; 29 Jun; 30 Jun; 1 Jul; 3 Jul; 4 Jul; 5 Jul; 6 Jul; 7 Jul; 8 Jul; 10 Jul; 11 Jul; 12 Jul; 13 Jul; 14 Jul; 15 Jul; 17 Jul; 18 Jul; 19 Jul; 20 Jul; 21 Jul; 22 Jul; 24 Jul; 25 Jul; 26 Jul; 27 Jul; 28 Jul; 29 Jul; 31 Jul; 1 Aug; 2 Aug; 3 Aug; 4 Aug.
— The Moving Finger: a story of Victoria’s early days (1933, novella; serialised – weekdays only – in The Age): 2 Jan; 3 Jan; 4 Jan; 5 Jan; 6 Jan (“TBC on Mon”); 9 Jan; 10 Jan; 11 Jan; 12 Jan; 13 Jan; 14 Jan (TBC tomorrow; but can’t find any item in this issue – maybe skipped, like previous week and continued on weekdays from here?); 16 Jan; 17 Jan; 18 Jan; 19 Jan; 20 Jan; 21 Jan; 23 Jan; 24 Jan; 25 Jan; 26 Jan; 27 Jan; 28 Jan; 30 Jan; 31 Jan; 1 Feb; 2 Feb; 3 Feb; 4 Feb; 6 Feb; 7 Feb; 8 Feb; 9 Feb; 10 Feb; 11 Feb; 13 Feb; 14 Feb; 15 Feb; 16 Feb; 17 Feb; 18 Feb; 20 Feb; 21 Feb; 22 Feb; 23 Feb (final).

Morris, Myra.**
— “Come Wind and Come Rain” (1931, poem)
Beggar’s Roost: A serial novel.
“Comedy in a Seaside Villa”. The Australian Women’s Mirror, Vol11/no.47, 15 October, 1935, p4, available on Trove.
Wind on the Water, published 28 October 1939 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove. May also be available via your library as an ebook; details on untapped.org.au
Young Grief. (Children’s/YA short story), published in The Home: An Australian Quarterly, Vol 20/no.4, 1 April 1939, p44, available on Trove. A young girl contemplates offering up a sacrifice after the loss of her idol.

Neville, Margot.** [aka sisters Margot Goyder and Ann Joske]:
Giving the Bride Away, (originally published 1930, New York: Bride and Company; republished 26 October 1935 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove.
—-. Jenifer’s Husband, published 2 January 1937 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove. Detective story.
Kissproof, (originally published 1928; republished 24 Octover 1936 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel).
Marietta is Stolen, (originally published 1922; republished 31 July 1937 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel; detective story).
Sugar Cured, published 23 May 1936 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove.

Palmer, Bessie aka Bessie Lilian Palmer b. 14 Dec 1880, Qld; d. 15 Jul 1964, Qld.
— “A pioneer of the Illawarra” (1936, prose)
— “A woman of the west: formerly painted royalty; now bakes bread” (1934, prose)
— “A woman on women church workers” (1938, prose)
— “‘An enchanted land’ Queensland’s Green Mountains” (1936, prose)
— “The bush nurse: a peep behind the curtain with a nightingale of the outback” (1938, prose; in The Australian women’s mirror)
— “Call to the country” (1934, short story)
— “Caloundra goes continental” (1937, prose)
— “Caloundra, unspoiled child of nature” (1935, prose)
— “Charming Caloundra homes in scenic setting” (1938, prose)
— “Dark skinned lover: how a white wife was swept away by passion” (1939, short story in The Australian women’s mirror, “Woman and crime” series)
— “Homecraft on wheels: a trip with Queensland’s travelling domestic science school” (1937, prose)
— “Margery’s Christmas gift: a bush romance” (1933, short story)
— “Mrs Graham chooses her gift” (1930, short story)
— “Murder in the glen” (1938, short story in The Australian women’s mirror; illustrated, “Woman and crime” series)
— “Pioneer days in Norther Queensland” (1935, prose)
— “Poets and trees” (1930, prose)
— “Quiet Caloundra is vice-regal choice” (1937, prose)
— “The return of James: how the waiting ended” (1930, short story)
— “She carved her name in stone: success story of Queensland sculptor, Miss Daphne Mayo” (1936, prose)
— “Tom Petrie’s home: Murrumba and its memories” (1930, prose)
— “Vice-regal holiday home with musical name” (1937, prose)
— “Vignettes of Caloundra” (1937, prose)

Palmer, Nettie; aka Janet Gertrude Palmer. b. 18 Aug 1885; d. 19 Oct 1964. [work in copyright until 2034]. Palmer wrote extensively throughout the 1930s for publications including The Age, The Argus, The Australian women’s mirror, The Brisbane Courier, The home: an Australian quarterly, and elsewhere. (The AustLit database entry for Palmer lists 541 in works in total.)
— “The sardine king” (1934, short story)

Park, Ruth b. 24 Aug 1917, Auckland, NZ; d. 16 Dec 1910, Sydney NSW; arrived in Australia in 1942.
— “The Lamp” (1936; prize-winning story in ENZED: “Young Story-Writers of New Zealand”)

Parry, Alice Fox (c1903-1951)
— “An Interview by Proxy” (1931, short story; The Australian Women’s Mirror)
Cross Currents (1934, novella): ch1; ch 1 cont.; ch2; ch3; ch4;  ch4 cont.; ch5; ch6; ch7; ch7 cont.; ch8; ch9; ch9 cont.; ch10; ch10 cont.; ch11; ch12; ch12 cont.; ch13; ch13 (cont.); ch14; ch14 cont.; ch15; ch16; ch16 cont.; ch17; ch17 cont.; ch18; ch19; ch19 cont.; ch20; ch21; ch21 cont.; ch22; ch23 (final).
Expert Advice (1933; novella serialised in The Argus ) Prologue and ch1 (13 Jun) – very faint, almost unreadable print; ch1 cont. (15 Jun); ch2 cont. (17 Jun); ch2 cont. (20 Jun); ch3 cont. (22 June); ch5 (24 Jun); ch5 cont. (27 Jun); ch6 (29 Jun); ch6 (1 Jul); ch7 cont. (4 Jul); ch8 (6 Jul); ch9 cont. (11 Jul); ch10 cont. (13 July); ch11 cont. (15 Jul); ch12 cont. (18 Jul) – very faint scan; ch12 cont. (20 Jul) – very faint scan; ch13 cont. (22 Jul); ch14 cont. (25 Jul) – faint scan; ch15 cont. (27 Jul); ch15 cont. (29 Jul); ch16 cont. (1 Aug) – faint scan; ch16 cont. (3 Aug); ch17 cont. (5 Aug); ch18 cont. (8 Aug) – very faint scan; ch19 cont. (10 Aug); ch20 (12 Aug); ch20 cont. (15 Aug); ch21 cont. (17 Aug); ch22 cont. (19 Aug);  ch22 cont. (22 Aug); ch23 cont. (24 Aug) final.
Flood Waters (1934 novella serialised in The Argus): ch1 (6 Feb); ch2 (8 Feb); ch3 cont. (10 Feb); ch4 cont. (15 Feb); ch5 cont. (17 Feb); ch6 cont. (20 Feb); ch8 cont. (24 Feb); ch9 cont. (27 Feb) – very faint print; ch10 cont. (1 Mar); ch11 cont. (3 Mar); ch12 cont. (6 Mar); ch13 cont. (10 Mar); ch15 cont. (15 Mar); ch16 (17 Mar); ch17 cont. (20 Mar); ch18 cont. (24 Mar); ch19 cont. (27 Mar); ch19 cont. (29 Mar); ch20 cont. (31 Mar); ch20 cont. (3 Apr); ch21 cont. (5 Apr); ch22 cont. (7 Apr); ch23 (10 Apr); ch23 cont.v (12 Apr) final.
— “River Gold” (1935, short story)
Shadowed Gold (1932, novella; serialised in The Argus): ch1 (5 Jul); ch1 cont. (7 Jul); ch2 cont. (12 Jul); ch2 cont. (14 July) – very faint copy; ch3 (19 Jul); ch3 cont. (21 Jul); ch3 cont. (26 Jul); ch4 cont. (28 Jul); ch5 cont. (2 Aug); ch5 cont. (4 Aug); ch6 cont. (9 Aug); ch7 cont. (11 Aug);  ch8 cont. (16 Aug); ch8 cont. (18 Aug); ch9 cont. (23 Aug); ch9 cont. (25 Aug); ch10 cont. (30 Aug); ch11 cont. (1 Sep); ch11 cont. (6 Sep); ch12 cont. (8 Sep); ch13 cont. (13 Sep); ch14 cont. (15 Sep); ch15 cont. (20 Sep); ch15 cont. (22 Sep); ch16 cont. (27 Sep); ch17 cont. (29 Sep); ch18 cont. (4 Oct); ch19 (6 Oct) final.
Song of the Night (1935, novella serialised in The Australasian): ch1 (18 May); ch1 cont., ch2, ch3, ch4, ch5, (25 May); ch6 and ch6 cont. (1 Jun) ch6 cont., ch7 and ch8 (8 Jun); ch9 cont.; ch10 and ch11 (15 Jun); ch12 (22 Jun); (29 Jun); ch16 (6 Jul); ch19 cont. (13 Jul); (20 Jul); ch27 (27 Jul) final.
The Vanishing Adventurer (1930-31, novella; serialised in The Argus): ch1 (9 Sep); ch1 cont. (11 Sep); ch1 cont. (16 Sep); ch3 (18 Sep); ch4 cont. (23 Dep); ch5 cont. (25 Sep); ch5 cont. (30 Sep); ch6 cont. (2 Oct); ch7 (7 Oct); ch7 cont. (9 Oct); ch8 cont. (14 Oct); ch9 cont. (16 Oct); ch10 (21 Oct); ch10 cont. (23 Oct); ch11 cont. (28 Oct); ch11 cont. (30 Oct); ch12 cont. (4 Nov); ch13 cont. (6 Nov); ch14 cont. (11 Nov); ch15 cont. (13 Nov); ch15 cont. (18 Nov); ch16 cont.(20 Nov); ch16 cont. (25 Nov); ch17 cont. (27 Nov); ch18 cont. (2 Dec); ch19 cont. (4 Dec); ch20 (9 Dec); ch20 cont. (11 Dec); ch21 (16 Dec); ch22 (18 Dec); ch22 cont. (23 Dec); ch24 (27 Dec); ch24 cont. (30 Dec); ch25 cont. (1 Jan 1931) final.
World’s End (1931-32, novella serialised in The Argus): ch1 (31 Oct); (7 Nov); (14 Nov); (21 Nov); (28 Nov); (5 Dec); ch7 cont. and ch8 (12 Dec); (19 Dec); (26 Dec); ch11 cont. (2 Jan); (9 Jan); ch13 cont. (16 Jan); ch14 cont. (23 Jan); ch15 cont. (30 Jan); ch16 cont. (6 Feb); ch17 cont. (13 Feb); ch18 cont. (20 Feb); ch19 cont. (27 Feb); ch20 cont. (5 Mar); ch21 (12 Mar); ch22 (19 Mar); ch24 (26 Mar); ch25 cont. (2 Apr); ch27 cont. (9 Apr); ch29 (16 Apr) final.

Powell, Elizabeth (birth name Effie Williams; aka Mrs Alfred Parsons etc).
The Father’s Have Eaten, published 4 February 1939 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove.
In the Path of Thunder, published 8 October 1938 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove.

Pelloe, Emily H b. 1877; d. 1941
West Australian Orchids (1930) – link to Project Gutenberg

Prichard, Katharine Susannah b. 1883, Levuka, Fiji; d. 1969 Biographical note (17 Feb 1937)
— “The Aborigine in Australian Literature“, British Annual of Literature, vol. 2 no. 1939: 49-53.
— “The bride of faraway” (1933, short story)
— “Buccaneers” (1935, short story)
— “During the war” (1932, poem; in paragraph, “A satchel of books”)
— “The flight” (1938, short story)
— “The frogs of Quirra-Quirra” (1932, short story)
— “Genevieve” (1938, short story)
— “The gentleman and the coals” (1933, short story)
Haxby’s Circus (1930, novel) – link to archive.org; access conditions apply
— “Henry Drake” (1933)
Intimate Strangers (1937; may be available via your local library as an ebook; details untapped.org.au)
— “Jimble’s Christmas” (1936, short story)
— “Josephina Anna Maria” (1937, short story)
— “Luck” (1937, short story)
— “Marlene” (1938, short story)
— “The mayor of Bardie Creek” (1937, short story)
— “Mrs Grundy’s mission” (1932, short story)
— “Mrs Jinny’s shroud” (1931, short story)
— “Painted finches” (1939, short story)
— “The prayer meeting” (1935, short story)
— “Sybil Thorndike: an impression” (1932, prose)
— “Sour sap: a monitory tale for misogynists” (1939, short story)
— “Wild oats of Han” (1926-27, novella serialised in The Home): 1 Jul; 2 Aug; 1 Oct; 1 Sep; 1 Nov; 1 Dec; 31 Dec; 1 Feb; 1 Mar; 1 Apr; 1 May (final).

Primrose, Adelaide, birth name: Adelaide Elizabeth Paton Primrose, a.k.a. Mrs L. J. F. Gatzemeyer; b. 22 Mar 1877 Adelaide, South Australia; d. Nov 1944 obituary (10 Nov 1944); obituary of her husband mentions a son, Geoffrey (1 Jan 1932)
— “A Haven of Rest” (1933, short story)
— “A New Year Greeting” (1930, poem)
— “The Christmas Crib” (1931, poem)
— “Christmas Morn” (1930, poem)
— “A Christmas Party” (1932, short story)
— “A Christmas Romance” (1930, short story): 27 Dec (bad quality print; reprinted here); 10 Jan.
— “Calvary” (1931, poem)
— “In Memory of Mrs Gertrude McAree” (1931, poem)
— “Lady Disdain” (1931, short story)
— “Message of the Bells” (1934, poem)
— “The Stockrider: a romance of the golden west” (1932, short story)

Ramsay, Isolde b. 1898, Dubbo NSW; d. 1946, Parramatta, NSW. Birth name: Isolde Brunhilde Warfel. Obituary (13 Jun 1946)
— [Australia Speaks (1939, poetry) – print copy available at SLNSW; reviewed in The Sydney Morning Herald, White Man, Beware!(12 Apr 1941: 6), includes a commentary: “The author of this poem,” Mr Joseph Hamlet informs us in a foreword, “has exhibited an heroic struggle for principle and truth; she stands almost alone… in defence of the Australian aborigine.” Also a quotation from the poem]
— “Companioned” (1939, poem)
— “The Daisy” (1933, poem for children)
— “Solace” (1938, poem)
— “The Young Dove” (1938, poem)

Ransom, Eva, birth name Eva Peck; b. 1857 Vic; d. 1940 Tas
— “Remembrance Day” (1933, poem)

Rattenbury, Mary; birth name Mary McIntyre; aka Mrs William Rattenbury; b. 12 Jul 1878, Ipswich, Qld; d. 23 Aug 1937, Brisbane, Qld.
— “An appreciation” (1936, correspondence)
— “Australia, land of muse” (1936, poem)
— “The beautiful girls of Yeppoon” (1935, lyric/song)
— “The day our old horse died” (1936, poem)
— “The deserted farm” (1936, poem)
— “Firelight magic” (1936; text unreadable, but reprinted in Pen Blossoms: verse from the garden of Years [1936], available at SLNSW)
— “The master of arts” (1936, poem)
— “The old house” (1935, poem)
— “The other day” (1936, poem)
— “The reveries of a soul” (1936, poem)

Richardson, Henry Handel* (1870-1946)
— The end of childhood and other stories (1934; contains “The bathe”, among others) – link to Project Gutenberg Australia
— “Two hanged women” (1934, short story from The end of childhood and other stories)
The Young Cosima (1939)

Roughley, Edna.** Footsteps, published 13 April 1935 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove.
Isn’t Life Queer?, published 24 November 1934 as an Australian Women’s Weekly novel and available on Trove.

Shaw, Una aka Una Yeatman Shaw, b. 1900 Singleton NSW;  d. 1970 Singleton, NSW
For Remembrance” (1931, poem in Women’s Mirror)
Epitaph” (1931, poem)

Simpson, Helen b.1897, d. 1940
Boomerang
, William Heinemann, London, 1932, 506 pp.
The woman on the beast: viewed from three angles, William Heinemann, London, 1933, 492 pp.
Under Capricorn, William Heinemann, London, 1937, 305 pp.

Simpson, Mary; birth name: Mary Williams; writes as “Weeroona”; b. 1884, Stawell, Vic.
The bay boat” (1930, poem)
Janetza” (1932, prose; “another vivid picture of factory life”)
— “The old shawl” (1930, short story)

Sketheway, Effie, Effie Edgar Sketheway, E E Sketheway b. Adelaide, SA; 31 Jan 1877; d. 23 Oct 1948 Adelaide, SA; aka A Muser; studied music at Adelaide University; was injured in an accident (perhaps a fall from a horse) and entered into a “Home for Incurables”.
More musings of a muser (1934, poetry) – link to SLVIC digital collection
Musings of a muser (1934, poetry) – link to SLVIC digital collection
Suggestion for Fancy Dress” (1935, correspondence)

Stanley, Millicent Fanny Preston MLA, aka M Preston Stanley Vaughan b. 9 Sep 1883, Sydney, NSW; d. 23 Jun 1955 Sydney, NSW
A cobweb in the sun” (1932, poem)
A woman’s prayer” (1934, prose)
Afterglow” (1933, poem)
Be a safe investment” (1933, prose snippet)
— “The bridge at evening” (1931, poem)
Daffodil gold” (1933, poem)
Don’t let go!” (1930, prose snippet)
Harbour ferries by night” (1936, poem)
Get hold of reality” (1933, prose; “from ‘My Daily Message’)
Is marriage a handicap to women’s ambition?” (1934, prose)
It is never too late” (1934, poem; very faint scan)
Judge by his enemies” (1936, prose)
Memory!” (1934, poem)
The phantom of mists” (1932, poem)
Pines at Manly” (1932, poem)
The price!” (1930, poem)
Reverie” (1933, poem)
“Sydney Harbour from the Bridge” (1932, poem)
[Untitled from “Home and Social”] (1935, prose snippet)
Wattle gold” (1936, poem)
The willow tree” (1931, poem)
Wisteria at Parramatta” (1936, poem)
A world menace: Russian commercial methods” (1931, prose)

Steele, Amy b. 1872 Melbourne, Vic; d. 1944
— “Class Prejudice”, The Brisbane Courier (1929, essay).
— “Forgetful Freddie” Brisbane Courier (1929, prose, domestic humour): Number 1; Number 2; Number 3; Number 4; Number 5; Number 6; [Number 7] 7 March; Number 8; Number 9; Number 10; [Number 11] 4 April.
— “Jacarandas“, The Brisbane Courier (1932, journalistic prose)
— “Wings of Thought: imaginative Christmas trip”, Sunday Mail (1932)

Stevens, J. M. aka Joan Marguerite Stevens; Janie M Stevens, Joan M Stevens; b. 1887; d. 30 May 1944. [works out of copyright]
— “Comic opera stuff” (1934, prose)
— “The luck of Atapu” (1931, short story)
— “Mistaken identiy: a shipboard mystery” (1934, short story)
— “The ubiquitous Quong” (1930, short story)

Stirling, Veda birth name: Edith Victoria Drummond; aka “Chichester”. b. 1873, Ballarat, Vic; d. 1954, Camberwell, Vic.
The after-glow and other poems (1931) – link to SLVIC digital collections
Australian springtime: and other poems (1931) – link to SLVIC digital collections
Bells, banners and bugles: and other poems (1931) – link to SLVIC digital collections
The call of the inland (1931) – link to SLVIC digital collections
The castle builders and other poems (1931) – link to SLVIC digital collections
The garden of laughter and other poems (1931) – link to SLVIC digital collections
Little saying for little people (1931) – link to SLVIC digital collections
Sense and non-sense: and other poems (1931) – link to SLVIC digital collections
Songs (1931) – link to SLVIC digital collections
The spirit of the garden (1931) – link to SLVIC digital collections

Suttor, Catherine. aka Mrs Allan Suttor, Mrs Alan Suttor; birth name: Catherine M J Bowerman; b circa 1856; died circa 1950; married Allan Albert Suttor in 1879.
— “The Span” (1931, poem)

Taylor, Agnes Rosamond; birth name Rosamond Benham; aka Benham Taylor; Mrs Thomas Gilbert Taylor; Lalage. b. 10 Oct 1874; d. 11 Dec 1923; married in 1903, petitioned for divorce 1913 ref.
— “Last Thoughts” (1931, poem)

Thompson, Florence aka Fairelie Thornton b. 1860; d. 1950 Chatswood NSW
Leaves From My Diary: Life’s Experiences (1932, biography)

Tomholt, Alice C. aka A C Tomholt; birth name: Alice Christina Tomholt; b. 1887, Richmond, Vic; d. 27 Oct, 1949, Ballarat, Vic.
— “The builders” (first published 1910, revised 1931; short story)
— “The sequel” (1930, short story)

Turner, Ethel. aka Mrs H R Curlewis, Ethel Sybil Turner, Ethel M Turner, Ethel Curlewis. b. 24 Jan 1870 di 8 Apr 1958 [works in copyright until 2028]
— “There was a cherry tree” (1934, poem)

Turner, Lilian,** aka Regan, Talking Oak, Mrs F. Lindsay Thompson; b.1867 Eng; d. 1956 Turramurra NSW
— “A Last Rose of Summer” (1931, short story)

Urquart, Jessie. b. 1890, NSW; d. 1948, London.
— “A Week In the Snow” (1933, short story romance)
— “In Alphabetical Order” (1933, short story romance)
— “The Miss” (1936, short story)
— “Two’s Company” (1933, short story)

Walker, Netta aka Netta Waller, Henrietta Walker; b. 1868, Windsor, NSW; [died? possibly 1942]; birth name: Henrietta Ann Walker; married George A Waller in 1915.
— [“Yesterday and the Day Before”, writing as “Henrietta Walker” in The Centenary Gift Book eds. Frances Fraser and Nettie Palmer: Melbourne, Robertson & Mullens for the Women’s Centenary Council, 1934); hard copy available at SLNSW; ref]

Weatherly, Francia b. 1882; d. 1964.
— “Caged Birds” (1932, poem)
— “Cynicism” (1933, short story)
— “Old Gold” (1933, short story)
— “Brown Veins” (1933, short story)
— “The Secret Place” (1933, short story)
— “The Scar” (1933, short story)
— “An Afternoon in Society” (1934, short story)
— “The Swagman” (1935, short story)
— “Quiet, Sleep and Rest!” (1935, short story)

Weatherly, Marjorie. Birth name: Mary Ann Marjorie Weatherly; aka Marjorie Carter; Marjory Carter, Mrs M. Carter, Mrs Carter. b. 1884 Ranxholme, Vic; d. 1967 Rupanyup, Vic.
— “Empty, Swept and Garnished” (1935, short story)

Whiting, Mary Bradford (1864-1835). Few bibliographical details for this author have been found. Her book A Daughter of the Empire is cited among notes for a Monash University exhibition on Australian Women Writers. Other indications that Whiting was Australian, or at least wrote in Australia, are the titles of several of her children’s books, including, Wallaby Hill and Josee: An Australian Story. A fragment of information on Josee. Chapter 1 of Sir Tristram, which was also serialised, contains a portrait of a female writer in her study. She also published numerous short stories for children in “The Girls Own Paper“).
— The Spellbinder introduced here; principal characters listed here; serialised in contemporary newspapers from 1932 on; available via Trove: Ch1, Ch2, Ch3, Ch4, Ch5, Ch6, Ch7, Ch8, Ch9, Ch10, Ch11, Ch12, Ch13, Ch14; Ch15, 16 &17; Ch17; cont. Ch17 & start Ch18; Ch18, 19 & 20; Ch20v; Ch21 & 22; Ch23; cont. Ch23 & Ch24; ; Ch25 & part Ch26; Ch26 (cont.) & Ch27; Ch27 and part of Ch28; continuation of Ch28; Ch29 & Ch30 (conclusion). (A number of journals/newspapers have been sourced for the above chapters as the quality of scans varies; this results in some overlapping of the story.)

Wildman, Ina M b. 1867; d. 1898 obituary (16 Nov 1896)
— “By the River” (1930, poem)
— “Imo Pectore” (1930, poem)
— “Life” (1930, poem)
— “Mistaken” (1930, poem)
— “The Red Handerchief” (1930, short story)

Wyatt, A Forsyth; birth name Annie Forsyth Evans, aka Annie Forsyth Wyatt; Mrs Ivor Bertie Wyatt. b. 3 Jan 1881; d. 27 May 1961. Secretary of the Tree Lovers’ Civic League, Kuring-gai; biographical snippet and portrait of author.
— “Centennial Park” (1931, correspondence)
— “National Park Trust” (1938, correspondence)
— “[To the editor of the herald]” (1937, correspondence)
— “Tree lovers’ league” (1931, correspondence)
— “Tree protection” (1931, correspondence)

~

Texts by Australian women published in 1940s >

* Links to the Australian Dictionary of Biography online
** Biographical and bibliographical information on the following authors can be obtained by subscription from AustLit:
Birkett, Winifred.
Bridges, Hilda.
Chadwick, Dorothy.
Drake-Brockman, Henrietta.
Ercole, Velia. (aka Margaret Gregory)
Grimshaw, Beatrice.
Heney, L.A.B.
Morris, Myra.
Roughley, Edna.

Note: For purposes of this list “Australian” is defined loosely and may include authors who wrote books while living in Australia, or who wrote books set in Australia. If you find other texts for this list, or better links to any of the books listed, please let us know via the contact page.